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This is a listing of all 19 E-Seminars

America Since 1945—E-Seminar 1, The Post–New Deal Order

Taught by: Alan Brinkley

What was once routinely known as "the postwar era" is now a period of more than half a century, during which the United States has probably changed more rapidly and profoundly than during any other period of its history. Historian Alan Brinkley offers an introduction to and a framework for understanding the United States since 1945.
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America Since 1945—E-Seminar 2, The Politics of Anticommunism

Taught by: Alan Brinkley

In this e-seminar, the second in a series of ten, Professor Brinkley examines the Cold War, a key event during the "the postwar era," a period of more than half a century, during which the United States has probably changed more rapidly and profoundly than during any other period of its history. He analyzes the Cold War as a force in American domestic life, one that had an important impact on the relationships among and the distribution of power within many of the central institutions of American life.
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America Since 1945—E-Seminar 3, The Stable Fifties

Taught by: Alan Brinkley

In The Stable Fifties, the third e-seminar in the series America Since 1945, Professor Alan Brinkley examines the shift in American economics and culture that occurred after World War II. While many other combatant countries faced a slow rebuilding period after the war's end, the United States celebrated a vast and steady economic boom that began during the war and continued for the next twenty years. Professor Brinkley examines aspects of American middle-class culture during the Eisenhower years, including the rise of television and the expansion of the suburbs. He also offers a perspective on the Eisenhower presidency.
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America Since 1945—E-Seminar 4, The Subversive Fifties

Taught by: Alan Brinkley

In The Subversive Fifties, the fourth e-seminar in the series America Since 1945, the eminent historian Alan Brinkley discusses a variety of early counterculture movements—literary, social, and environmental—whose origins date back to the 1950s and early 1960s. He also covers the roots of the civil-rights movement, discussing the Montgomery bus boycott, in which Martin Luther King Jr. first gained national attention.
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America Since 1945—E-Seminar 5, Kennedy, Johnson, and the Great Society

Taught by: Alan Brinkley

In Kennedy, Johnson, and the Great Society, the fifth e-seminar in the series America Since 1945, the eminent historian Alan Brinkley focuses on the administrations of Presidents John Kennedy and Lyndon Johnson. Professor Brinkley compares and contrasts these two great figures of the 1960s and analyzes the social programs, such as the Great Society and the war on poverty, that became landmarks of the period.
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America Since 1945—E-Seminar 6, The Civil-Rights Movement

Taught by: Alan Brinkley

In The Civil-Rights Movement, the sixth of ten e-seminars in the series America Since 1945, historian Alan Brinkley discusses one of the most important social movements in twentieth-century American history. He analyzes the events that propelled and shaped the civil-rights movement, the growing national awareness of racial inequalities in America, and the social policies that were created in response to those inequalities.
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America Since 1945—E-Seminar 7, The Vietnam War

Taught by: Alan Brinkley

In The Vietnam War, the seventh of ten e-seminars in the series America Since 1945, historian Alan Brinkley discusses the policies and decisions that led to the expansion of U.S. involvement in the Vietnam War.
includes curricular materials


America Since 1945—E-Seminar 8, Cultural Revolutions

Taught by: Alan Brinkley

In Cultural Revolutions, the eighth of ten e-seminars in the series America Since 1945, historian Alan Brinkley discusses the turbulent years of the 1960s and the broad social changes that altered cultural and individual expression in American society.
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Intellectual and Cultural History of the United States, 1890–1945—E-Seminar 1, The Crisis of Victorianism

Taught by: Casey Nelson Blake

Between the end of the Civil War and 1900, educated Americans reacted against Victorian values. In the first in a series of e-seminars, Casey Blake describes the new attitudes about the future, the separation of the sexes, masculinity, and the role of women. He concludes by reflecting on the beginnings of modernism at the end of the nineteenth century.
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Intellectual and Cultural History of the United States, 1890-1945—E-Seminar 2, The Search for a Scientific Culture

Taught by: Casey Nelson Blake

By the end of the nineteenth century, science and technology were exerting a tremendous influence on life in the United States. In this second e-seminar of the series, Casey Nelson Blake explores why Darwin's ideas seemed so revolutionary and how Darwinism helped to move the United States toward a more secular and scientific modern culture.
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Slavery and Emancipation—E-Seminar 1, The Origins of Slavery in the New World

Taught by: Eric Foner

Nearly 150 years after its abolition, slavery remains one of the central institutions defining American history and nationality. This e-seminar examines the origins and development of the transatlantic slave trade and the impact of slavery on colonial America during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. New World slavery became more oppressive than previous forms, and the underpinnings of the institutionalization of slavery in America included new racist attitudes.
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Slavery and Emancipation—E-Seminar 2, The Struggle for Freedom

Taught by: Eric Foner

In this second e-seminar of his Slavery and Emancipation series, Professor Eric Foner examines slavery and the American Revolution. He examines the dramatic struggle for freedom waged concurrently by American colonists against the British Empire and by blacks against the institution of slavery. While blacks seized the revolutionary rhetoric of liberty and equality to justify their natural right to freedom, the U.S. Constitution protected the institution of slavery.
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Slavery and Emancipation—E-Seminar 3, The Old South

Taught by: Eric Foner

In the third e-seminar in the series Slavery and Emancipation, Professor Eric Foner discusses the expansion of slavery during the first half of the nineteenth century, when it became the most powerful economic institution in the United States. He describes the arguments that proslavery Southerners used to defend their "peculiar institution" and details the system of subordination they created whereby slaves had virtually no legal rights.
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Slavery and Emancipation—E-Seminar 4, Abolitionism and Antislavery

Taught by: Eric Foner

In Abolitionism and Antislavery, the fourth e-seminar of the series Slavery and Emancipation, Eric Foner describes how in the nineteenth century the issue of slavery came to occupy a central place in American political life and a central role in the disruption of the Union. He describes the development of a militant abolitionist movement, the expansion of slavery, secession, and other events that led inexorably to the Civil War.
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Slavery and Emancipation—E-Seminar 5, The Civil War

Taught by: Eric Foner

In The Civil War, the fifth in the series Slavery and Emancipation, Professor Eric Foner explores the combination of factors that propelled the Lincoln administration down the road to emancipation. Foner also describes how the service of black men in the Union forces contributed to the war's outcome and raised the question of black citizenship.
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The History of the City of New York—E-Seminar 1, History as Destiny: The Case of New York City

Taught by: Kenneth T. Jackson

New-York Historical Society President and eminent Columbia University historian Kenneth T. Jackson has been teaching a course on the history of New York City for over thirty years. Through this series of online lectures, Jackson recreates the experience of his legendary Columbia University class with the complement of a wealth of documentary photographs, maps, and other illustrative material.
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The History of the City of New York—E-Seminar 2, Colonial City: Revolutionary Battleground

Taught by: Kenneth T. Jackson

In his second e-seminar, Kenneth T. Jackson traces New York City's commercial character back to the days of Dutch New Amsterdam. He then examines New York's role in the Revolutionary War and the remarkable growth it experienced largely as a result of the Erie Canal.
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The History of the City of New York—E-Seminar 3, Urban Crisis: Fire and Water

Taught by: Kenneth T. Jackson

Urban Crisis: Fire and Water is the third e-seminar in The History of the City of New York, a series based on Kenneth T. Jackson's legendary course, which he has taught for over three decades, on the history of New York City. In this e-seminar, Professor Jackson examines the various ways that over the years New York City has responded to fires and water supply problems, two of the serious challenges faced by urban populations.
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The History of the City of New York—E-Seminar 4, Urban Crisis: Disease, Crime, and Space

Taught by: Kenneth T. Jackson

In this fourth in a series of eight e-seminars, Professor Kenneth T. Jackson, examines public space in New York and focuses on the creation of Central Park. He also discusses the creation of the Metropolitan Board of Health, the implementation of health and sanitary regulations as a response to outbreaks of cholera, and the founding of the New York City Police Department.
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