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APUSH-1

Discovery and Settlement of the New World, 1492-1650


A.  Europe in the sixteenth century

B.  Spanish, English, and French exploration

C.  First English settlements

1.  Jamestown

2.  Plymouth

D.  Spanish and French settlements and long-term influence

E.  American Indians


Resources:

History as Destiny: The Case of New York City
Resource Type: E-Seminar

Relevant transcripts:
New York is not just another place
New York versus Boston

Relevant interactive tools:
New York Is Old
New York Is Old as a Big City
New York Is a Business Town
New York Is Old
New York Is Old as a Big City
New York Is a Business Town
Spanish Cities
French Cities
British Cities
Boston
Spanish Cities
French Cities
British Cities
Boston

Colonial City: Revolutionary Battleground
Resource Type: E-Seminar

Relevant pages:
Dutch New York

Relevant transcripts:
Henry Hudson
The Indians' Mistake
The Dutch and Indian Wars
A Company Town

Relevant interactive tools:
The Dutch Empire
Verrazano
The Native American Population
The Dutch Governors
The Dutch City Plan
The Dutch Empire
Verrazano
The Native American Population
The Dutch Governors
The Dutch City Plan

Urban Crisis: Fire and Water
Resource Type: E-Seminar

Relevant interactive tools:
How Important Is Water?
Don't Be Stupid; Look for Water
How Important Is Water?
Don't Be Stupid; Look for Water

The Origins of Slavery in the New World
Resource Type: E-Seminar

Relevant pages:
Slavery in History: New World Encounters
Slavery in History: The Legacy of 1492
The Triangular Trades: The Expansion of Europe
The Triangular Trades: The Slave Gun Cycle
Slavery in the Americas: Free to Forced Labor
Slavery in the Americas: Plantation Agriculture

Relevant texts:
Excerpt from An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith (1776).
Excerpt from An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith (1776).
Excerpt from an indentured servant's letter to his parents (1623).

Relevant transcripts:
Professor Foner compares the benefits and misfortunes resulting from the "discovery" of America.

Relevant interactive tools:
Professor Foner explains how European monarchs and merchants wanted to bypass the Arab, Berber, and Muslim middlemen, who dominated the international trade routes acress Africa and the Middle and Near East to India and China. A direct water route instead, from Europe to China, around the southern tip of Africa, promised the Europeans greater control and wealth.
Professor Foner explains how European monarchs and merchants wanted to bypass the Arab, Berber, and Muslim middlemen, who dominated the international trade routes acress Africa and the Middle and Near East to India and China. A direct water route instead, from Europe to China, around the southern tip of Africa, promised the Europeans greater control and wealth.

The Struggle for Freedom
Resource Type: E-Seminar

Relevant pages:
Timeline

Slavery in History: New World Encounters
Resource Type: Primary Source
This map from Theatrum orbis terrarum (1570) by Abraham Ortelius depicts what the European explorers understood of their world in the period after Columbus's encounters. The interior of the Americas, compared to that of Africa and Asia, was relatively unknown and, hence, unmapped by famous European cartographers.

Slavery in History: New World Encounters
Resource Type: Primary Source
This detail of the same map from Theatrum orbis terrarum (1570) depicts the African continent, showing how both the interior and exterior were well known to European travelers, explorers, and cartographers. Notice the detailing of port cities on the west coast as well as the important towns and rivers inland.

The History of the City of New York—E-Seminar 2, Colonial City: Revolutionary Battleground
Resource Type: E-Seminar
In his second e-seminar, Kenneth T. Jackson traces New York City's commercial character back to the days of Dutch New Amsterdam. He then examines New York's role in the Revolutionary War and the remarkable growth it experienced largely as a result of the Erie Canal.

Discovery and Settlement: New Amsterdam
Resource Type: Document-Based Question
The present-day issues of tolerance and diversity are explored in colonial society. These primary sources provide contemporary perceptions of Native Americans, African Americans, Jews, and European settlers.

Slavery in History: New World Encounters
Resource Type: Primary Source
This map from Theatrum orbis terrarum (1570) by Abraham Ortelius depicts what the European explorers understood of their world in the period after Columbus's encounters. The interior of the Americas, compared to that of Africa and Asia, was relatively unknown and, hence, unmapped by famous European cartographers.

Excerpt from An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith (1776).
Resource Type: Primary Source

Slavery in History: The Legacy of 1492
Resource Type: Primary Source
This hand-colored facsimile of an engraving (1564) by Jacques Le Moyne de Morgues shows French settlers arriving on the Florida coast.

Excerpt from An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith (1776).
Resource Type: Primary Source

Systems of Slavery: Diversity
Resource Type: Primary Source
A British cartographer counters the prevalence of French maps with the British view of the New World. The territory highlighted in yellow shows the French presence on the fur-bearing western and northern frontiers. Virginia and the Chesapeake are also delineated (1755).

Slavery in History: New World Encounters
Resource Type: Primary Source
This map from Theatrum orbis terrarum (1570) by Abraham Ortelius depicts what the European explorers understood of their world in the period after Columbus's encounters. The interior of the Americas, compared to that of Africa and Asia, was relatively unknown and, hence, unmapped by famous European cartographers.

Slavery in the Americas: Plantation Agriculture
Resource Type: Primary Source
A Counterblaste to Tobacco by James I, king of England (1604)

Mapping Early New York City
Resource Type: Classroom Simulation
In this innovative simulation students learn the skills of mapping. Although focused here on the early history of New York City, these skills can be applied to any urban center in any time period.

Slavery in History: New World Encounters
Resource Type: Primary Source
This map from Theatrum orbis terrarum (1570) by Abraham Ortelius depicts what the European explorers understood of their world in the period after Columbus's encounters. The interior of the Americas, compared to that of Africa and Asia, was relatively unknown and, hence, unmapped by famous European cartographers.

Slavery in History: New World Encounters
Resource Type: Primary Source
This map from Theatrum orbis terrarum (1570) by Abraham Ortelius depicts what the European explorers understood of their world in the period after Columbus's encounters. The interior of the Americas, compared to that of Africa and Asia, was relatively unknown and, hence, unmapped by famous European cartographers.

Slavery in the Americas: Plantation Agriculture
Resource Type: Primary Source
This engraving of the Algonquian village of Secotan is based on a watercolor by John White, who had traveled to a part of "Virginia" that is now known as the outer banks of North Carolina (1590).


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