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APUSH-29

Truman and the Cold War


A.  Postwar domestic adjustments

B.  The Taft-Hartley Act

C.  Civil Rights and the election of 1948

D.  Containment in Europe and the Middle East

1.  Truman Doctrine

2.  Marshall Plan

3.  Berlin crisis

4.  NATO

E.  Revolution in China

F.  Limited war: Korea, MacArthur


Resources:

New Deal Order
Resource Type: E-Seminar

Relevant pages:
Legacies
Legacies: New Deal Legacy
The New Framework: The GI Bill
The New Framework: The Full Employment Bill
The New Framework: The Fair Deal
The New Framework: Postwar Domestic Order
The Cold War: the Soviet Union
The Cold War: The Long Telegram
The Cold War: Containment
The Cold War: Defending Our Own Sphere
Containment Policy Tested
Containment Policy Tested: Aid as Stategy
Containment Policy Tested: The Truman Doctrine
Containment Policy Tested: The Marshall Plan
Key Figures
Timeline

Relevant texts:
Text of George F. Kennan's "Long Telegram," February 22, 1946.
Ask Alan Brinkley: When did the Cold War actually begin?
Interview with General George C. Marshall. 30 October 1952

Relevant transcripts:
An ambitious agenda, most of the Postwar Program never passed.
Optimism: In 1945, some diplomats still believed that Stalin was reasonable.
According to Kennan, the Soviets were out to destroy American society.
Kennan seemed to be ceding Eastern Europe to the Soviets.
Kennan on where to resist communism: Not everywhere.
The Cold War gave the Marshall Plan a new urgency.

The Politics of Anticommunism
Resource Type: E-Seminar

Relevant pages:
Impact of the Cold War

Relevant transcripts:
Professor Brinkley introduces this e-seminar.
Why were people so afraid?

Relevant interactive tools:
Chronology
Chronology

Key Figures
Resource Type: Primary Source

America Since 1945—E-Seminar 1, The Post–New Deal Order
Resource Type: E-Seminar
What was once routinely known as "the postwar era" is now a period of more than half a century, during which the United States has probably changed more rapidly and profoundly than during any other period of its history. Historian Alan Brinkley offers an introduction to and a framework for understanding the United States since 1945.

Physicist's Testimony to Congress
Resource Type: Primary Source
This excerpt is from an exchange between Dr. Morrison, a professor of physics at Cornell University, and Mr. Morris, a member of the U.S. Senate Subcommittee to Investigate the Administration of the Internal Security Act. An article that Dr. Morrison had published in the Bulletin of Atomic Scientists, February 1949, was the subject of this exchange.

Student Information Given to Federal Investigators
Resource Type: Primary Source
This article in the Columbia University student newspaper reports that the dean of students provided federal investigators with information about students who had attended the university.

The Counterculture
Resource Type: Document-Based Question
Although the decade of the 1950s deserves its reputation as an age of political, social, and cultural conformity, seeds of social discontent nevertheless permeated American society. This carefully crafted DBQ focuses on the intellectual and artisitic critics of the affluent society, as well as the origins of the women's and civil-rights movements.

Levitt On Communism and Home Ownership
Resource Type: Primary Source
As the first community of its kind, Levittown, New York, located 25 miles east of Manhattan on Long Island, heralded the postwar arrival of suburban America with its mass-produced housing. William Levitt is quoted as saying the following.

Schlesinger on Freedom
Resource Type: Primary Source
Arthur M. Schlesinger Jr., a noted American historian, wrote this influential book to argue that a rejuvenated faith in democratic ideals and the continuation of New Deal liberalism would safeguard America from the twin threats of totalitarianism and fascism.

Historians Debate: Who Is Responsible for the Cold War?
Resource Type: Classroom Simulation
This simulation involves a fictitious conference held in the year 2002, in which three groups of Cold War historians—orthodox, revisionist, and post-revisionist—debate the origins of the Cold War. Who is to blame, the United States, the Soviet Union, or both?

The New Framework: The Full Employment Bill
Resource Type: Primary Source
Still from In Our Hands, Part 2: What We Have (1950).

The New Framework: Postwar Domestic Order
Resource Type: Primary Source
Veterans sign up for GI Bill programs.

New Deal Liberalism and Postwar Economic Growth
Resource Type: Document-Based Question
The primary sources in this DBQ help students explore the legacy of New Deal liberalism as American society is transformed during the 1940s and 50s. Economic, political, and social issues interact to simultaneously and paradoxically enhance and undermine government intervention in American society.

The Counterculture
Resource Type: Document-Based Question
Although the decade of the 1950s deserves its reputation as an age of political, social, and cultural conformity, seeds of social discontent nevertheless permeated American society. This carefully crafted DBQ focuses on the intellectual and artisitic critics of the affluent society, as well as the origins of the women's and civil-rights movements.

Levitt On Communism and Home Ownership
Resource Type: Primary Source
As the first community of its kind, Levittown, New York, located 25 miles east of Manhattan on Long Island, heralded the postwar arrival of suburban America with its mass-produced housing. William Levitt is quoted as saying the following.

Schlesinger on Freedom
Resource Type: Primary Source
Arthur M. Schlesinger Jr., a noted American historian, wrote this influential book to argue that a rejuvenated faith in democratic ideals and the continuation of New Deal liberalism would safeguard America from the twin threats of totalitarianism and fascism.

The Avant-Garde Artists of the 1950s
Resource Type: Classroom Simulation
In this creative simulation, students role-play avant-garde artists of the 1950s to discuss important issues of the times (politics, the affluent society, race relations, women, etc.) from an artistic and intellectual perspective.

Text of George F. Kennan's "Long Telegram," February 22, 1946.
Resource Type: Primary Source

Containment Policy Tested
Resource Type: Primary Source

Key Figures
Resource Type: Primary Source

America Since 1945—E-Seminar 2, The Politics of Anticommunism
Resource Type: E-Seminar
In this e-seminar, the second in a series of ten, Professor Brinkley examines the Cold War, a key event during the "the postwar era," a period of more than half a century, during which the United States has probably changed more rapidly and profoundly than during any other period of its history. He analyzes the Cold War as a force in American domestic life, one that had an important impact on the relationships among and the distribution of power within many of the central institutions of American life.

Containment Policy Tested: The Marshall Plan
Resource Type: Primary Source
Photo of Marshall (left) at Harvard commencement, June 5, 1947, with James Bryant Conant, president of Harvard, and General Omar Bradley.

Interview with General George C. Marshall. 30 October 1952
Resource Type: Primary Source

Key Figures
Resource Type: Primary Source


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