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APUSH-6

Constitution and New Republic, 1776-1800


A.  Philadelphia Convention: drafting the Constitution

B.  Federalists versus Anti-Federalists

C.  Bill of Rights

D.  Washington's presidency

1.  Hamilton's financial program

2.  Foreign and domestic difficulties

3.  Beginnings of political parties

E.  John Adams' presidency

1.  Alien and Sedition Acts

2.  XYZ affair

3.  Election of 1800


Resources:

Urban Crisis: Fire and Water
Resource Type: E-Seminar

Relevant texts:
The Manhattan Company

The Struggle for Freedom
Resource Type: E-Seminar

Relevant pages:
Introduction
The American Revolution: Free Blacks
The American Revolution: Slavery Expands
The Constitution: Slavery Defended
American Nationhood: American Identity
American Nationhood: Racism and Citizenship
Conclusion
Who's who

Relevant transcripts:
Professor Foner discusses slavery at the Constitutional Convention.
Professor Foner discusses extraterritoriality and the 3/5 clause of the Constitution
Professor Foner explains restrictions to U.S. Citizenship.
Professor Foner explains why blacks were not permitted to emigrate to the U.S.

Abolitionism and Antislavery
Resource Type: E-Seminar

Relevant pages:
The Abolitionist Position: Core Concepts

The American Revolution: Free Blacks
Resource Type: Primary Source
Liberty Displaying the Arts and Sciences, a painting by Samuel Jennings (1792). Liberty personified as a benevolent woman, holds forth the promise of freedom to well-dressed blacks, kneeling and praying.

The American Revolution and Its Legacy
Resource Type: Document-Based Question
In exploring the radical and conservative aspects of the American Revolution, these documents introduce students to the principles of equality and republicanism and the arguments for independence from Great Britain (via the Declaration of Independence and Thomas Paine's Common Sense).

Abigail Adams to John Adams
Resource Type: Primary Source
In 1776, Abigail Adams wrote a letter to her husband, John Adams, who was then attending the Continental Congress in Philadelphia.

The Constitution and Slavery
Resource Type: Primary Source
The Constitution's clauses relating to slavery did not mention the word "slavery.”

The American Revolution and Slavery
Resource Type: Document-Based Question
The revolutionary era (1775–89) gave birth to contradictory definitions of freedom and equality. For some, freedom and equality entailed the right to property, including slave property. For others, freedom and equality implied universal entitlements that applied to all individuals, including slaves. This DBQ offers students the opportunity to debate these contradictory definitions by analyzing the definition of freedom each author uses in the provided documents.

The Constitution: Slavery Defended
Resource Type: Primary Source
George Washington presiding at the signing of the new Constitution at the second Constitutional Convention, September 17, 1787.

The Constitution and Slavery
Resource Type: Primary Source
The Constitution's clauses relating to slavery did not mention the word "slavery.”

George Washington (1732–99)
Resource Type: Primary Source
During the American Revolution, George Washington (1732–99) served as Commander of the Continental Army, and in 1789 he became the first president of the United States. When newly appointed as commander of the Continental Army, Phillis Wheatley wrote a poetic tribute to Washington, offering her good wishes for his success in the great revolutionary cause.

George Washington (1732–99)
Resource Type: Primary Source
During the American Revolution, George Washington (1732–99) served as Commander of the Continental Army, and in 1789 he became the first president of the United States. When newly appointed as commander of the Continental Army, Phillis Wheatley wrote a poetic tribute to Washington, offering her good wishes for his success in the great revolutionary cause.

Phillis Wheatley (c. 1753–84)
Resource Type: Primary Source
Phillis Wheatley (c. 1753–84), born in Africa, was the first black woman whose poetry was published in the Western Hemisphere. In Europe and the United States in the 1780s, she developed a reputation as a literary figure. A devout Christian, she wove religious themes into many of her poems, including her eulogy for Samuel Sewall, author of The Selling of Joseph.

The American Revolution: Slavery Expands
Resource Type: Primary Source
Alexander Hamilton (1755-1804)


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