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APUSH-9-C

Westward expansion


1.  Advance of agricultural frontier

2.  Significance of the frontier

3.  Life on the frontier; squatters

4.  Removal of American Indians


Resources:

The Old South
Resource Type: E-Seminar

Relevant interactive tools:
In the nineteenth century, slavery spread rapidly throughout the South, crossed the Mississippi River into Texas and Arkansas, and began to concentrate in the richest cotton-growing regions. An internal slave trade developed to supply slaves to the expanding Cotton Kingdom of the Deep South.
In the nineteenth century, slavery spread rapidly throughout the South, crossed the Mississippi River into Texas and Arkansas, and began to concentrate in the richest cotton-growing regions. An internal slave trade developed to supply slaves to the expanding Cotton Kingdom of the Deep South.

The Crisis of Victorianism
Resource Type: E-Seminar

Relevant pages:
Turner and the End of the Frontier

Relevant texts:
Frederick Jackson Turner "The Significance of the Frontier in American History" (1893)

Relevant interactive tools:
Turner argued that Americans' New World experience had aided democracy.
Turner argued that Americans' New World experience had aided democracy.

Abolitionism and Antislavery
Resource Type: E-Seminar

Relevant interactive tools:
Geography of Slavery
Geography of Slavery

The Civil War and the Expansion of Slavery
Resource Type: Document-Based Question
This DBQ focuses on the decade of crisis, the 1850s, during which the question of the expansion of slavery tore the country apart. The documents selected include the classic evidence that can be used to prove that the expansion of slavery was the most important cause of the Civil War, 1861–65.

Calhoun on the Compromise of 1850
Resource Type: Primary Source
John C. Calhoun became the South's most powerful advocate as senator from South Carolina for most of the period from 1832 to 1850.

National Democratic Party Platform of 1860
Resource Type: Primary Source
In 1860, the Democratic Party split along sectional lines, leaving the Southern Democrats as the dominant party of the South. In the 1860 presidential election, the Southern Democrats won every state of the Deep South, the first states to secede.

Crittenden's Proposed Amendment
Resource Type: Primary Source
Abraham Lincoln has been elected President and the threat of secession hangs over the Union. What is Crittenden's plan?

Response to the Crittenden Amendment
Resource Type: Primary Source
This editorial responds to Crittenden's proposal to amend the Constitution.

Mississippi's Declaration of Secession
Resource Type: Primary Source
The first state to secede was South Carolina, doing so on December 20, 1860. Before the end of February, all the states of the Deep South (Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, and Texas) had seceded.


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Historical thinking 

Discovering primary sources (5) 

Interpreting and analysing (4) 

Narrating history (1) 

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