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There are 52 items indexed to this topic.


NCHS-6-1-B

The student understands the rapid growth of cities and how urban life changed


Resources:

History as Destiny: The Case of New York City
Resource Type: E-Seminar

Relevant transcripts:
Cities Have Personalities Too

Relevant interactive tools:
New York Enchants John Reed
New York Enchants John Reed
Cities as Playgrounds
Military Establishments
Cities as Playgrounds
Military Establishments
French Cities
Newport
Charleston
Philadelphia
French Cities
Newport
Charleston
Philadelphia

Urban Crisis: Fire and Water
Resource Type: E-Seminar

Relevant pages:
New York City Grows
Disasters

Relevant texts:
Telegraphs and Building Codes
More Water than Any Other Large City

Relevant transcripts:
Growth Causes Problems
The Urban Response
Solving the Fire Problem

Relevant interactive tools:
SIDEBAR: Chicago and San Francisco
SIDEBAR: Chicago and San Francisco

Urban Crisis: Disease, Crime, and Space
Resource Type: E-Seminar

Relevant pages:
Central Park
Public Health
Crime and Public Order

Relevant texts:
Preventing Cholera
One-Tenth the Death
Never Again

Relevant transcripts:
Creating Safety
Summer of 1863
Response to the Riots

Relevant interactive tools:
Central Park Bird's Eye View. Lithograph by Bachman (1863).
Central Park Bird's Eye View. Lithograph by Bachman (1863).

City Problems: Poverty and Slums
Resource Type: Document-Based Question
Exploring the cholera epidemic in mid-nineteenth century New York City, this selection of primary sources provides a case-study of immigration, urbanization (e.g., slums such as the Five Points), and social and moral reform that can be applied to the study of any city in the industrialized world.

Petition to Have the Five Points Opened
Resource Type: Primary Source
Merchants owning property along the periphery of Five Points petitioned the municipal government in 1829 to demolish the heart of the slum by widening and extending Anthony and Cross Streets.

Daily Tally of Cholera Victims
Resource Type: Primary Source
Due to overcrowding and poor sanitation, the Five Points slum suffered numerous casualties during outbreaks of disease, as this daily report taken during the 1832 cholera epidemic makes clear.

Cholera Outbreak
Resource Type: Primary Source
This article, written during the cholera epidemic of 1832, conveyed the opinion that only certain social types contracted the deadly disease.

Cholera Epidemic Editorial
Resource Type: Primary Source
As far away as New Hampshire, editorials denounced the New York cholera epidemic of 1832 as divine retribution for decadence and sin.

Annual Report of the Interments
Resource Type: Primary Source
Dr. John Hoskins Griscom (1809–74), a Quaker physician, founded the New York Academy of Medicine and pioneered the field of public health. His advocacy for sanitation, medical care, and adequate housing led to the great reforms of the Progressive Era after the Civil War.

Charles Dickens on the Five Points
Resource Type: Primary Source
The famed British writer Charles Dickens published his account of his 1842 visit to America, where he found evidence of England's superior class system in the squalor of New York's Five Points slum.

Sunshine and Shadow in New York
Resource Type: Primary Source
Sunshine and Shadow in New York, a mid-nineteenth-century publication, depicts New York City as two polar societies, one affluent and vibrant, and one poor and diseased.

How the Other Half Lives
Resource Type: Primary Source
Newspaper reporters, such as Jacob Riis (1849–1914), played an instrumental role in exposing the destitution and misery of New York's immigrant and working-class neighborhoods.

Tenement Slum
Resource Type: Primary Source
Jacob Riis, a reporter for the New York Sun newspaper, helped raise awareness about the conditions of the urban poor with his 1890 publication, How the Other Half Lives: Studies among the Tenements of New York. This book would later influence Theodore Roosevelt.

Twenty Years at Hull House
Resource Type: Primary Source
Jane Addams, a leading social worker during the Progressive Era, founded the Hull House settlement for immigrants in Chicago in 1889. She wrote about her experiences there in Twenty Years at Hull House, published in 1910.

Margaret Sanger on Working Women
Resource Type: Primary Source
Margaret Sanger became nationally famous for organizing a birth-control movement. In this 1915 issue of the International Socialist Review, Sanger discusses working women.

Brooklyn Bridge
Resource Type: Primary Source
An important American modernist painter, John Marin (1870–1953) established his reputation with his work in watercolors. Although known for his landscape paintings, Marin expresses his interest in urban life in Brooklyn Bridge, which associates the excitement of New York with the famous bridge. The bridge connects Manhattan to Brooklyn and had been completed about thirty years earlier, in 1883.

Sumner on Social Darwinism
Resource Type: Primary Source
William Graham Sumner was an American social scientist influenced by Herbert Spencer and Charles Darwin. Sumner applied Darwin's evolutionary theory to human society.

Petition for Reservoir Rights
Resource Type: Primary Source
San Francisco petitioned Congress for use of the Hetch Hetchy area of Yosemite National Park for reservoir rights. The petition was presented at the congressional hearing before the Committee on the Public Lands of the House of Representatives.

Fire
Resource Type: Primary Source
Since 1873, New York has had fireboxes on its streets.

Disasters
Resource Type: Primary Source
Wreck of the steamboat General Slocum (June 15, 1904).

Cities Deal with Water
Resource Type: Primary Source
Fairmount waterworks, Philadelphia (1874).

The History of the City of New York—E-Seminar 4, Urban Crisis: Disease, Crime, and Space
Resource Type: E-Seminar
In this fourth in a series of eight e-seminars, Professor Kenneth T. Jackson, examines public space in New York and focuses on the creation of Central Park. He also discusses the creation of the Metropolitan Board of Health, the implementation of health and sanitary regulations as a response to outbreaks of cholera, and the founding of the New York City Police Department.

The Draft Riots
Resource Type: Primary Source
Recruiting station for the Union Army, in City Hall Park (1864).


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