Columbia University Digital Knowledge Ventures
Columbia American History Online

Main Menu
E-Seminars
searchhelp

There are 87 items indexed to this topic.


NCSS-9

Global Connections


Resources:

The Vietnam War
Resource Type: E-Seminar

Relevant pages:
Introduction
A Bigger Story
A Bigger Story: The First Indochina War
Two Vietnams
Two Vietnams: The Churchill of Southeast Asia
No Choice
No Choice: Ironic Consequences
Why America Failed
Alternatives: A Two-Sided Stalemate
Alternatives: A War Unlike Others
Conclusion

History as Destiny: The Case of New York City
Resource Type: E-Seminar

Relevant interactive tools:
Spanish Cities
Spanish Cities

Colonial City: Revolutionary Battleground
Resource Type: E-Seminar

Relevant transcripts:
The British Army
The Battle of Fort Washington
The Battle of Fort Lee
A Debt to Washington
The City Burns
Nathan Hale
Why Does New York Rise Up Out of the Ashes?

Relevant interactive tools:
The Dutch Empire
Verrazano
The Dutch Empire
Verrazano
New York in Revolution
The Howe Brothers
Washington's Dilemma Part 1
The Battle of Long Island
Washington's Dilemma Part 2
Washington and Ho Chi Minh
New York in Revolution
The Howe Brothers
Washington's Dilemma Part 1
The Battle of Long Island
Washington's Dilemma Part 2
Washington and Ho Chi Minh

Urban Crisis: Disease, Crime, and Space
Resource Type: E-Seminar

Relevant texts:
Cholera

New Deal Order
Resource Type: E-Seminar

Relevant pages:
The Cold War: the Soviet Union
The Cold War: The Long Telegram
The Cold War: Containment
The Cold War: Defending Our Own Sphere
Containment Policy Tested
Containment Policy Tested: Aid as Stategy
Containment Policy Tested: The Marshall Plan

Relevant texts:
Text of George F. Kennan's "Long Telegram," February 22, 1946.
Ask Alan Brinkley: When did the Cold War actually begin?
Interview with General George C. Marshall. 30 October 1952

Relevant transcripts:
Optimism: In 1945, some diplomats still believed that Stalin was reasonable.
Pessimism: Other policymakers compared Stalin to Hitler.
According to Kennan, the Soviets were out to destroy American society.
Kennan seemed to be ceding Eastern Europe to the Soviets.
Kennan on where to resist communism: Not everywhere.
The Cold War gave the Marshall Plan a new urgency.

The Politics of Anticommunism
Resource Type: E-Seminar

Relevant transcripts:
Why were people so afraid?

The Stable Fifties
Resource Type: E-Seminar

Relevant pages:
National Politics

The Origins of Slavery in the New World
Resource Type: E-Seminar

Relevant pages:
Slavery in History: New World Encounters
Slavery and Empire
Systems of Slavery: The Chesapeake

The United States in Vietnam
Resource Type: Classroom Simulation
In this simulation, a special congressional committee—the U.S. Senate Subcommittee on Vietnam—will examine changes in U.S. foreign policy toward Vietnam from 1954 through 1975. The committee will investigate why the United States entered the war but failed to prevent the communist takeover of the Republic of South Vietnam. Students will impersonate historical characters who are called to testify before this fictitious Senate subcommittee. The historical characters will explain, from their perspective, why the United States entered the war, why it escalated its military involvement there, and then, despite the escalation, why it suffered defeat. Do the senators and journalists reporting on the investigation blame any one U.S. president? Or do they blame rather a wide range of circumstances both domestic and international? This simulation will expose students to a variety of conflicting interpretations of the U.S. role in Vietnam.

Vietnam and President Nixon
Resource Type: Document-Based Question
This DBQ focuses on Richard Nixon's conduct of the Vietnam War. The documents are drawn from the period between 1968, when Richard Nixon successfully campaigned for the U.S. presidency, and 1973, when the Paris Peace Accords, which formalized the end of U.S. involvement in the war, were signed by the United States, South Vietnam, and North Vietnam. Students will investigate the extent to which the Nixon administration was able to achieve the "honorable peace" he promised the American public.

The Cold War: the Soviet Union
Resource Type: Primary Source
Dean Acheson in 1945.

Text of George F. Kennan's "Long Telegram," February 22, 1946.
Resource Type: Primary Source

Discovery and Settlement: New Amsterdam
Resource Type: Document-Based Question
The present-day issues of tolerance and diversity are explored in colonial society. These primary sources provide contemporary perceptions of Native Americans, African Americans, Jews, and European settlers.

The American Revolution: Defeat and Victory in New York
Resource Type: Document-Based Question
New York City was a center of loyalist support and trans-Atlantic trade during the revolutionary era. The documents on the Battle of Brooklyn, the British occupation, and the end of the Revolutionary war demonstrate how these events were turned into victories for New York, establishing the city's path toward national and world prominence.

Urban Society: Central Park and Social Reform
Resource Type: Document-Based Question
This microhistory of Central Park in New York City provides students with a laboratory for learning how social reformers attempted to clean the city of its slums and promote the well-being of its residents. These tools can be applied to the study of any large city.

The Cold War: Domestic and Foreign Concerns
Resource Type: Document-Based Question
These primary sources allow students to carefully examine the foreign and domestic factors that contributed to the Cold War, including the Yalta Conference, communist containment and the domino principle, domestic politics and McCarthyism, American and Soviet expansionism, and American and Soviet paranoia.

Eisenhower and the Politics of the 1950s
Resource Type: Document-Based Question
This selection of primary sources gives students an opportunity to examine different layers of dissent during the Eisenhower presidency. Although President Eisenhower enjoyed great public support, his administration was challenged by problems at home and abroad.

Beyond Vietnam
Resource Type: Primary Source
This speech was delivered by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. on April 4, 1967, at a meeting of Clergy and Laity Concerned at Riverside Church in New York City.

Common Sense
Resource Type: Primary Source
Thomas Paine (1737–1809) was born in England and emigrated to the colonies in 1774. In Common Sense, Paine articulates his argument for independence.

The White Man's Burden
Resource Type: Primary Source
This cartoon, referring to Rudyard Kipling's poem of the same name, was published as the Spanish-American War ended and the insurrection in the Philippines against the Americans began.

Southern Society: Religion and Slavery
Resource Type: Document-Based Question
Using this DBQ, students will examine the paradoxical role of religion in the lives of slaves in the antebellum South. Different kinds of religion are explored as students confront the ways in which religion served to liberate or to oppress slaves.

Equiano: A Slave's Autobiography
Resource Type: Primary Source
Olaudah Equiano was enslaved as a child after he and his sister were kidnapped in Africa. His autobiography offers a rare comparison of African and American cultures.

A Slave Funeral
Resource Type: Primary Source
Charles Ball was a slave in western Maryland. In the following excerpt, he describes a slave funeral.

Stringfellow's Biblical Justification for Slavery
Resource Type: Primary Source
In his 1860 book, Thornton Stringfellow explains what he sees as the biblical justification for slavery.

A New Masculinity
Resource Type: Point-Counterpoint
Historians are grappling with the changing definitions of American male identity that developed at the end of the nineteenth century. Casey Blake argues that American men were looking for ways to "compensate" for what they regarded as the feminine elements of modern life, particularly those brought about by rapid urbanization and industrialization. In response, a new definition of manhood, what Blake terms "aggressive male individualism," emerged. A teacher examines the interpretations of Gail Bederman and Susan Curtis.

The New World: Origins of Slavery
Resource Type: Document-Based Question
The following primary sources, focusing on Bacon's Rebellion, help students understand the condition of freemen and indentured servants on the eve of the revolt and how colonial legislation helped institutionalize slavery in the southern colonies.

Colonial Society and Economy
Resource Type: Document-Based Question
Colonial society (Virginia in particular) changed from a society with slaves to a slave society, where slavery was the foundation of the economic and social order. This selection of primary sources allows students to understand how commerce and agricultural production caused slavery to replace indentured servitude in the southern colonies and to create new forms of wealth.

Bacon's Rebellion: Colonial Society and Politics
Resource Type: Classroom Simulation
In this simulation, which focuses on Bacon's Rebellion, students will recreate colonial society with a view to understanding how the legal and economic infrastructure of the colonies facilitated the development of slavery.

The Avant-Garde Artists of the 1950s
Resource Type: Classroom Simulation
In this creative simulation, students role-play avant-garde artists of the 1950s to discuss important issues of the times (politics, the affluent society, race relations, women, etc.) from an artistic and intellectual perspective.

Containment Policy Tested
Resource Type: Primary Source

Containment Policy Tested: The Marshall Plan
Resource Type: Primary Source
Photo of Marshall (left) at Harvard commencement, June 5, 1947, with James Bryant Conant, president of Harvard, and General Omar Bradley.

Interview with General George C. Marshall. 30 October 1952
Resource Type: Primary Source

Interpretations of the Red Scare
Resource Type: Primary Source
U.S. Army poster from the mid-1950s.

Public Health
Resource Type: Primary Source
The expansion of world trade promoted the spread of cholera.


Refine Browse

Historical thinking 

Discovering primary sources (13) 

Interpreting and analysing (33) 

Narrating history (16) 

Resource types 

Video Transcripts (14) 

Text Excerpts (4) 





CAHO is being provided to you for your own use. Any copying or distribution of CAHO materials is prohibited.